Visual Perception

In today’s post I decided to cover visual perception. For the past month or two I have been working with my sons on a project. The Dark Woods book project. We love the books we have written, but we would like to see them as a graphic novel. The idea came from the fact that my son thought it would be easier for other children to read his books if they were graphic novels. This was also important to him because the first book he read independently was a graphic novel.

Unfortunately, I am an abstract artist not a graphic artist/novelist. The writing of the books was difficult to say the least, now this. But, out of love for my son, and some strange desire to give something of myself back to him, I made the choice to try. It has not been easy. Transitioning from one art form to another is foreign; at least it is to me.

However, there is something that typically happens when you venture out of your comfort zone and learn something new. What happens is that you end up discovering something of value. For me, this something of value was that it helped me to take a really good look at my own visual perception and its given me some insights into my learning disabilities.

I have tried to explain before that I see things differently then others. But since a picture is worth a thousand words, lets look at a photo. This is my daughter (Say hello!):

Original Photo

Original Photo

My apologies the photo is grainy.

I did a free hand drawing of the photo without using lines or boxes (this is a tool used by artist to help with drawing faces). I wanted the photo to be the same size as the other one. But I had trouble  – see the photo:

My drawing without the use of the tools.

My drawing without the use of the tools.

Looking at the photo you can see the distortion immediately. To really evaluate it, I will apply lines and highlight a few of those lines.

Adding the lines with a ruler.

Adding the lines with a ruler.

Looking at the photo and the drawing close up.

Looking at the photo and the drawing close up.

Starting with line 1 you can see problems. However, look at likes 4 through 8. The eyes are too large, the nose is too long, and the mouth doesn’t seem to be where it should be. If you look closely you will also see that the shading is awkward (if you can use that word to describe art).  The shading of the lower eye in my drawing makes it look like I was giving my drawing a black eye. That is because I have difficulty understanding the color tones in the black and white photo that I used to create this drawing.

If I placed more lines on the paper, even more details and anomalies would show up. One might ask, how does this relate to reading and writing?

When I fail to see what is before me, I not only have difficulty modeling that thing, I also have difficulty describing what I do see. Anyone who has had difficulty with drawing would say that my art looks horrible not because I do not see well, but because I am not a good artist. And they would be correct; I am not a good portrait artist. Just like in school there are students who are not good in school because they are either not good students or they are not good in a particular subject.

What I am talking about are the students who actually see things in a distorted way. These types of distortions compound my difficulty with reading and writing. Are there other ways that things are distorted? Yes, there are. This was one way to actually show it. To highlight what things can look like when they are on paper.

Look again at the 3rd photo. If I was writing letters on a page, a teacher might notice something like very large letters that do not stay on the line (like the way my eyes and nose are falling into the next space). The teacher might notice that I may be missing details like a word or a letter (like how I miss the details in the shading). They might notice that I turn things backwards. This one is harder to spot in the drawing, but check out the bottom half of each earring, neither of them is facing the right direction. The earing on the left side of the face in my drawing is facing the neck. This earing should be facing away from the neck. The earing in the drawing on the right is turned towards the shoulder. This earing should be facing the viewer.

Now, how do I resolve these issues when I see things the way that I do? In regards to art, I have to start to use the tools that make artists better, like lines and rulers and shapes. These things are difficult for me to use because I am unfamiliar with them. I know a circle from a square, but I struggle with using the circle to create a face – so I have to practice this over and over until I can use it easier.  I have practiced at least one drawing per day for weeks now, and I am still struggling to remember tools I learned in the beginning. This is something we in the research community are working on – why do students like myself forget instructions, even though we might master them during the time we are being instructed?

When writing and reading, I have to practice reading and writing. I have to try various techniques and I have to keep using them until I learn to do them on my own.  Will I ever be a great portrait artist, I do not believe that I will, but the tools have helped me to create some art that I can be proud of.  Just like practicing reading and writing has helped me to be proud that I can communicate.

Attached, take a look at some of what I have been able to do when I have the right tools and some support from teachers and family.

You can still see visual issues appear and you still have distortions in things like the nose.

You can still see visual issues appear and you still have distortions in things like the nose.

But there is more of a natural look starting to show.

But there is more of a natural look starting to show.

It alters the graphic work too. Not perfect, but not where I began.

It alters the graphic work too. Not perfect, but not where I began.

When you are working with a student who has reading and or writing problems, try figuring out how they see and if they can describe it. Then try to figure out tools to assist them in practicing. I believe that the more you use your tools, the better you become with those tools.

Until Next Time.

Dr. Richmond

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The LD Experience Continues

This week I had the pleasure of conversing with a great group of people online about how it feels to be dyslexic. This is such a great thing to talk about because we often hear clinical definitions about terms like dyslexia, but rarely do we experience the individual perspective.

When I first read the title of this discussion thread, I was nervous to express my opinion because I have more than one LD. Still, the only way for any of us to really dive into such an issue is for someone with the issue to share – eventually the bits and pieces will create some kind of picture.

In thinking about my experiences with my children and throughout my life, I began diving into this question.  I explained to the group how individuals in my home had issues with the following (these are not all of the issues – its a baseline to help continue the conversation):

  1. Word recognition – We would practice a word all week, pass the test on Friday and though we knew what the word meant, we were unable to spell it by Monday.
  2. Word and letter reversals – Though there is discussion in the field as to weather this is a left-right issue or dyslexia or whatever.  What this means to members in our house hold is that we typically start from the wrong end.  Which means if I need to use a letter like b, d, q, or p, I might not know which one is B.  It means we might start from the wrong end of the word when trying to sound it out or we might start from the wrong end of the sentence.  For my son however, this meant he wrote backwards entirely for many years.  One could hold his papers up to a mirror and read them.  He is now in his teens and finds that this still happens from time to time.
  3. Direction – Only one of us can go to a location one time and find our way back. The rest of us must use directions, landmarks, and or symbols to get back to that location.
  4. Wrong Word Usage – It is common to hear the wrong word used for any particular item.
  5. Hand Signals – There is a lot of finger snapping, pointing, hand movements (jazz hands), and jabbing because the words will not come out and this forces us to improvise. It’s like a huge game of Pictionary – the image of what you desire to say is at the tip of your tongue and you just can’t get past it. It is not that we do not know the information, it is there and that is one of the most frustrating parts.
  6. Lists  – Forgetting is common, so we attempt lists, but we often forget those lists if we sit them down.
  7. Vocabulary – We all have limited verbal vocabulary and often write using simple vocabulary, but we have a vast vocabulary in our heads that we struggle to utilize.
  8. Recall – We struggle to verbally recall – though we can often write what is missing since we developed the writing skills.
  9. Vocal Sounds – Grunting is also common in our house when we struggle to use our words.
  10. Clumsiness – At any given time one of us will hit a wall, fall down stairs, trip on nothing, fall out of a chair, or collide into one another.
  11. Headaches – Those of us with LD struggle with learning headaches, as I like to call them. This occurs from the strain that happens when you are trying to make sense of what you see.
  12. Difficulty reading the words on the page – there are many things associated with this one items, for now I will just say that it’s like the page and the words play tricks on you even though there is nothing wrong with your vision.
  13. Forgetfulness – We continually forget important details or how to follow through when writing things out. We may begin on a thought and never branch out to the other details. We might forget why those details are important or that we forgot those details at all.
  14. Mistaking – This is harder for me to describe today, but say I write a paper and I read it over in an attempt to edit. Because I know what I wanted to be there, I have actually read the paper via what is in my head and missed mistakes that were actually in the test.

What this tells you is the experience to some degree, but not specifically how we have felt. We have swung the pendulum from feeling “stupid” because we are dyslexics, to feeling “acceptance” because we cannot change this condition, to feeling “joy” because we have found something special about our selves as a result of dyslexia.  There are days when I am proud to say I have dyslexia and days where I long to read/write/think without problems.

With these types of issues, how then did we learn to read and write?

We began slowly. Taking things one-step at a time, often to the point of exhaustion.

Attached I am providing the layout for the  5-paragraph essay. I created this and have used it to teach my children to write. I use this layout during the school year, in the summer and on breaks to re-enforce what my children learn in school. This is not a stand-alone tool; there are other tools you need when working with your children on how to write, read, understand, and express.

I began using this tool when my children where in the 3rd grade. It took a very long time for it to sink in, but we continued to work on this until they got it right.  I hope it is as beneficial to you all as it has been for us.

I will try to post more of these tools as I work through this blog.

If you have tools that have worked for you, please share them or send them to me so I can share them with a link to your website or whatever profile you choose. The more we share our stories, the more we learn.

Until Next Time,

Dr. Richmond

Organizing Your Essay

Also, if you notice errors, please contact me. I am happy to fix them. I knew going into this experience that my LD might show and while it might be embarrassing sometimes, the only way you are going to understand what I am saying is to see those mistakes in my writing. I maintain this set of facts: (1) Writing is not my first language, (2) I write this blog to share information and to practice the skill. I hope each day to grow this part of my life. I will gladly make changes because it makes this a more efficient page. And I thank you in advance for your assistance.

The Hidden Disability?

A common set of phrases/questions I hear my non-LD peers say, “You don’t look like you have a learning disability. Is that a real thing or are you just looking for special treatment? You don’t look disabled.”

What I have learned from this is that people don’t understand things that they cannot see with their own eyes. When a person has a physical disability it is most likely visible. This is not always true – as some physical disabilities are not visible to the naked eye.

However, it is this lack of understanding that can make it very difficult for people in the LD Community. It makes us feel like we have to defend ourselves as a disabled people.

I can give you an example. I was lucky enough to have the opportunity to go back to school to try to obtain a college degree. At the time, I was a single mother of one. I was in an IT job during a time when our company was merging into another company. We knew that lay-offs were pending, so I went back to college to get skills in another vocation.

I had been in class with a certain individual for a few years and this year we were going to have to take a foreign language and a math class. I have never been good at math and I have NEVER been able to learn another language. I knew I was in trouble. Every day I sat in the front of class, taking my notes. I copied both textbooks from cover to cover, and I was hoping that “something” the teachers said would rub off on me.

The 1st day of this incident the other student was sitting next to me in math class and I had taken a huge breath and sighed. I had been up all night trying to study for two (supposedly) simple exams. My confidence was in the gutter because I could not remember the formulas and I was mixing up the vocabulary for Spanish.

I remembering the other student turning to me and saying, “What are you so frustrated about?”

“I’m nervous about this test.” I replied.

“Why?” She asked. She had a very bright smile on her face. Her eyes were shinny and blue. I remember them because they were so vibrant.

“Because I have a learning disability.” I remarked.

“Oh, is that all?” She said waving my comment off with the flick of her hand, “You’ll grow out of it. Besides, it’s not a spelling test.”

I thought about explaining to her in more detail, but she had already turned her head and started talking to another student.

The 2nd incident happened about a week later. I was talking to another student when that same woman approached us. She was happy that she received an “A” on both the Spanish and the math exam. She inquired about how we (the other student and I) had done on the tests. I explained that I had failed them both. The other student said she had done “ok” and left.

She replied…(AND I quote), “You have to learn to be more positive and stop letting this whole ‘learning disability’ thing be a crutch. I’m sure most of it is just in your head.”

That was the very last time I spoke to that woman. She may not have meant any harm, but she was causing me a great deal of it with her lack of understanding – her lack of empathy. I am sure she thought what she said to me was enlightening. I believe she may have believed every word she spoke. I regret not speaking up at that time. I am not sure what I could have said – what I should have said – but I should have spoken up. Truth be told, my frustration with her did not actually come from her. It came from the fact that I run into people like this all of the time.

This post is my way of taking a step in that direction.

There are multiple characteristics that could identify someone as having an LD. I am not going to be able to list them all. I have included a few questions with each category to help to show some ways an individual might be impacted.

(This is a sample. I am not a therapist. This information is presented to help to aid in understanding – NOT to diagnose.)

Visual Perception Issues:

Do you have difficulty distinguishing between color or remaining focused on one object when there is a lot of color?

Do you have difficulty with optical illusions in pictures and photographs or in real life?

Do you have difficulty remembering the things you have seen?

Do you have difficulty expressing to others things you have seen?

Auditory Perception Issues:

Do you have trouble understanding what others say?

Is your vocabulary limited as compared to your peers?

Are you able to sound out words, but still have difficulty with spelling and /or do you rely on others to spell words for you?

Do you have a difficult time understanding what you read?

Do you have difficulty with abstract ideas?

Do you have difficulty filtering out or distinguishing between sounds?

Do you have difficulty remembering the things you hear or need others to constantly repeat their statements?

Do you need to use your hands to gesture when you are speaking?

Olfactory Issues:

Do you have difficulty knowing when something smells bad?

Do you have difficulty because you are smelling too many things?

Do you have difficulty describing the way things taste and smell?

Right/Left Discrimination Problems:

Do you have difficulty distinguishing between letters like « b » and « d »?

Do the words ever flicker on the page as you read?

Do you have difficulty remembering what symbols connect with what letters?

Do you struggle to remember directions such as left and right?

Do you struggle with transposing numbers, such as using 38 for 83?

Do you have difficulty distinguishing between similar concepts?

Do you use the wrong words to describe things, mistaking up from down or in from out?

Tactile, Memory and Mind:

Are you over sensitive to touch and feel?  (Do you feel like you can feel one object through another, or like you can feel things you should not be able to feel)?

Do you have difficulty paying attention to things around you?

Do you need to rely on touch to be able to remember how to complete every day tasks?

Are you athletic (Are you good at sports, do you run often, etc.)?

Do you have difficulty with tasks that require you to have good hand-eye coordination?

Do you need to move your body  when you speak (gesture with your hands, tape your feet, rock your torso, etc.)?

Do you often need more time than others to process your thoughts?

Do you often think faster than you can speak (example : you write a sentence but miss a few words because you are going to fast)?

Do you have difficulty controlling your thoughts?

Do you have trouble remembering your thoughts long or short term?

Organization and Sequencing:

Do you struggle to see patterns or trends (Example : if an author is telling a story, do you struggle to see the clues that explain the direction of the story)?

Do you struggle to recall or distinguish between categories (Example : distinguishing between comparing and contrasting a plot or synopsis)?

Do you struggle to form logical patters with what looks like random information (Example: when reading do you tend to miss clues in the writing that point to the ending of the story)?

Do you have difficulty staying on topic when you are talking or writing?

Do you struggle to put things in sequential (abc or 1-2-3) order?

Do you struggle NOT to put things in sequences or in steps in order to process them?

Please take some time to get the facts. If you believe you are coping with an LD, seek help. Here are some websites that might be beneficial:

http://www.learningdifferences.com/main_page.htm

http://www.ncld.org/types-learning-disabilities

http://www.ldonline.org